Ep004: Aussie Pronunciation of Goin’ detha beach (Going to the beach)

In this episode of Aussie English I discuss how our pronunciation of “going to the beach” changes as we speak at a more natural quick speed. The transcript of the episode is written below. So click play and read along as I speak to you guys in this latest episode!

Ep004: Aussie Pronunciation of Goin’ detha beach (Going to the beach)

Hey guys, welcome to this episode of Aussie English. Today I’m actually really excited because I’m going to go over something with you guys that is more along the lines of pronunciation and Aussie grammar as opposed to talking about expressions or specific vocabulary. Today I want to talk to you about how we speak and how we shape certain sentences and change our pronunciation as we increase the speed at which we talk.

I’m sure most of you know if you’ve met an Australian or if you’ve been to Australia how quickly some Australians can speak, and how much harder it becomes to understand some of these Australians, or most of these Australians, when they speak incredibly quickly. It’s one of those things that I think is the case in any language no just English or Australian English but obviously I know Australian English better than I know other languages so it’s some… and the context of this podcast is Australian English. So that’s why we’re talking about it.

Anyway, so I think part of the reason Australians are harder to understand when they speak quickly is because we do change the sounds that we use. One example is that we don’t use “Ts” as much when we speed up, and we say “Ds” instead, because if you’re trying to articulate every single letter and every single word when you speak quickly it’s a lot more difficult than if you were to speak slowly, and it also tends to sound a little peculiar. And so I actually notice that when I with people who speak English as a foreign language that I slow down and I articulate my words and pronounce things more properly and become a lot more easier for them to understand, but subconsciously when I’m around other Australians I really speed up the way that I speak and the way that I pronounce things.

So today I want to use one example where I’m going to use the construction:

  • Pronoun + Verb + To Go To The Beach

And I’m going to show you how the sound of the sentence changes as I speed up. So I’m going to go through four or five different verbs:

  • I want to
  • I’m going to
  • I need to
  • I’ve got to
  • I have to

And I’m going to follow each one of these with “(go) To The Beach”. The first example if I say “I want to go to the beach” I pronounce that perfectly, you know, like I say every single syllable “I want to go to the beach”, but when I speed up I can’t do that. I can’t articulate each one of those.

So I say… so:

  • “I want to go to the beach”

Becomes

  • “I wanta go to the beach”

Becomes

  • “I wanna go detha beach”.

So you have:

  • “I want to go to the beach”

Which becomes

  • “I wanta go to the beach”

Which then becomes

  • “I wanna go detha beach”.
  • “I wanna go detha beach”.
  • “I wanna go detha beach”.
  • “I wanna go detha beach”.
  • “I wanna go detha beach”.
  • “I wanna go detha beach”.

So you can see when you speed it up it sounds, to me it sounds… that’s how I would speak when I speak quickly.

  • “Hey mum, hey dad! I wanna go detha

I would never say, “Hey mum, hey dad! I want to go to the beach.”, because it requires a lot more effort for me to say “I want to go to the beach” incredibly quickly like that. So it’s a lot easier to say “I wanna go detha beach”.

So another example with “I’m going to go to the beach”. We’ll go through that.

  • “I’m going to go to the beach”.

This is at slow pace.

  • “I’m going to go to the beach”.

Which becomes.

  • “I’m goin’ ta go to the beach”.
  • “I’m goin’ ta go to the beach”.
  • “I’m goin’ ta go to the beach”.

So it’s that “goin’ ta”, “goin’ ta”, “goin’ ta”, and when you go really quickly it becomes “gonna”, “gonna”, “gonna”.

  • “I’m gonna go detha beach”.
  • “I’m gonna go detha beach”.

So you’ll notice also that the “to the” becomes a “detha”, “detha”, “detha”. It kind of gets swallowed in that sentence. So let’s practice.

  • “I’m gonna go detha beach”.

I’ll do it slowly.

  • “I’m gonna go detha beach”.
  • “I’m gonna go detha beach”.
  • “I’m gonna go detha beach”.
  • “I’m gonna go detha beach”.
  • “I’m gonna go detha beach”.

So the next one:

  • “I need to go to the beach”.

Becomes

  • “I need ta go to the beach”.

Which then becomes

  • “I needa go detha beach”.
  • “I needa go detha beach”.
  • “I needa go detha beach”.
  • “I needa go detha beach”.
  • “I needa go detha beach”.
  • “I needa go detha beach”.
  • “I needa go detha beach”.

So we’ll do:

  • “I’ve got to go to the beach”.

Going slowly

  • “I’ve got to go to the beach.”

Becomes

  • “I’ve got ta go to the beach.”

Becomes

  • “I’ve gotta go detha beach.”
  • “I’ve gotta go detha beach.”
  • “I’ve gotta go detha beach.”
  • “I’ve gotta go detha beach.”
  • “I’ve gotta go detha beach.”
  • “I’ve gotta go detha beach.”
  • “I’ve gotta go detha beach.”

Now let’s do the last one:

  • “I have to go to the beach.”

Becomes

  • “I have ta go to the beach.”

Becomes

  • “I havda go detha beach.”
  • “I havda go detha beach.”
  • “I havda go detha beach.”
  • “I havda go detha beach.”
  • “I havda go detha beach.”
  • “I havda go detha beach.”

Awesome, awesome. And now we’ll finish it off with

  • “Where are you going?”.

This is what may be asked before you say “I’m gonna go detha beach”.

  • “Where are you going?”

However this often gets shortened to:

  • “Where ya goin’?”

And the reason that it gets shortened to “where ya goin’?” is because it’s a lot harder to say “where are you going?” when you speak quickly. So… whereas saying “where ya goin’?” is a lot easier.

So the four steps to… that go from “where are you going?” to “where ya goin’?”:

  • “Where are you going?” – obviously no change.
  • “Where are ya goin’?” – where “you” and “going” have been changed to “ya goin’”.
  • And then we contract “where” with “are” “where’re”.
  • “Where’re ya goin’?” “Where’re ya goin’?”

And “where’re ya goin’?” becomes just “where ya goin’?” because it’s… again harder to say “where’re” when you speak quickly. It’s a lot easier to just say “where”.

  • “Where ya goin’?”
  • “Where ya goin’?”
  • “Where ya goin’?”
  • “Where ya goin’?”
  • “Where ya goin’?”

And you can answer this with:

  • “I’m going to the beach”.
  • “I’m goin’ ta the beach”.
  • “I’m goin’ detha beach”.
  • “I’m goin’ detha beach”.
  • “I’m goin’ detha beach”.

So there you go. That’s one break down of some of the… the differences in how we would pronounce these kinds of words in English. So prepositions between and after verbs like “going” and “to” and “to go”. That “to” often gets swallowed and turned into a “te” (or ”ta”) or a “de” and the same thing happens to “to the” before nouns like “the beach” becomes a “detha”.

So I hope that’s helped. I hope that’s given you some insight into why we speak the way we do as well as give you a way to understand what we mean and what we’re saying when we speak quickly like that. So it’ll be really good practice if you listen to this podcast several times and you practice the pronunciation and how we say these sentences even if you’re just training your ear so that when someone speaks to you who’s speaking Australian English you’ll understand what they’re saying even if you yourself don’t pronounce “I’m goin’ detha beach” like that.

I hope that’s helped. So give me some feedback, give me some comments, let me know what you think, let me know how I can improve. I would love to give you guys as many useful tips, resources, advice, whatever I can in order to help you learn Aussie English. So until next time have a good one!

 

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