AE 265 – AEVB: Burnouts & Fruitloop Neighbours

Learn Australian English in this episode of Aussie English Video Breakdowns where I break down a news report about burnouts and fruitloop neighbours!

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AE 265 – AEVB: Burnouts & Fruitloop Neighbours

This car copped the brunt of one neighbour’s fury.

It was around 10:30 last night when a long-running neighbourhood dispute on Write Road turned violent.

(I’d) Come outside, jumped in me car and gone and ripped it up the road, (did a) nice big burnout.

And then we’ve had some crazy bastard from down the road come and shoot at us pretty much.

(He) pumped two into me (my*) windscreen, one into the radiator, one into the bumper, and then one into the house, one at me while I was on the deck.

A 61 year old man who lives two doors up had had enough of 23 year old Shane Tenagus and his hooning ways.

Was he saying anything to you?

Do you motherfuckers think your deadly?

And that’s it.

That’s all he said, and then he’s just shot everything in sight.

Shane chased the neighbour home, but that’s when it took a nastier turn.

Shane claims the neighbour pointed and fired a bullet at him.

You decided to chase him.

Yeah, I did. Why’s that?

I had a kid inside here.

I was going to belt out the shit out of him too.

Gonna come up here and shoot my house while I got a kid inside?

That’s just unacceptable.

Even though we did a burnout. It’s still unacceptable.

Shane’s 2 year old had been sleeping.

His partner was also in the house.

What was going through your head when your car’s getting fired shots at…

What a crazy ^&*%! What a fruitloop!

Who does this? You know, that’s fruit loop.

Honestly! I got no car now.

Shane copped a wound to his toe, but no serious injuries.

The car and its contents a little more worse for wear.

They might be crash-resistant, but they definitely ain’t bullet-proof.

Neighbours have told 9 News that burnout’s are constantly being performed along this street, and they understand why the 61 year old man finally exploded.

We got a lot of traffic coming down here.

(We’ve) got kids and school buses and animals.

Now I can understand why people’re getting a bit annoyed.

But Shane says he’s not the only culprit.

Burnouts happen out here all the time.

It’s a regular thing. It’s not me. It’s not just me.

There is a lot of young people out here that do it.

And I’m getting shot.

And it’s not the first time Shane’s hubby has put him in the firing line.

Only last week his floodlight copped a bullet from the same disgruntled neighbour.

They’re ringing me up going there’s someone here shooting the house.

And then I came back to no window and floodlight blown.

Why did he do it that time?

A mate did a burnout outside.

A fad that’s sure to live on in this street.

Police have arrested the 61 year old man, but he’s yet to be charged.

Hannah Dawkins 9 News.

All right guys, so let’s break down this video.

This car copped the brunt of one neighbor’s fury.

So she is said, “To cop the brunt of a neighbour’s fury”.

“To cop the brunt of something” is to receive or to bear the larger amount of something, and it’s negative.

So for example, “Dad yelled at both of us, but Pete copped the brunt of his anger.”

So that would be like Dad mostly yelled at poor Pete, but I got away with it and didn’t get too much of his anger.

I didn’t cop the brunt of it.

Pete copped the brunt of it.

This car copped the brunt of one neighbour’s fury.

(I) Jumped in me car here and gone and ripped it up the road.

Then the guy says “jumped in me (my*) car and went and ripped it up the road”.

So that just means to drive recklessly up the road, to rip it up the road.

So to drive really recklessly, do burnouts, and for example, you could say “After dad finished yelling he got in his car ripped it up the road”.

So it would be like dad got in his car and drove really dangerously up the road.

Jumped in me car here and gone and ripped it up the road.

Crazy old bastard from down the road come and shoot at us pretty much.

Then the guy says, “That crazy old bastard from down the road”.

Crazy old bastard.

That’s just a derogatory way of saying crazy old man.

So for example, “The neighbours thought that dad was a crazy old bastard.”

Crazy old bastard from down the road come and shoot at us pretty much.

“Pumped two into me (my*) windscreen.”

Then he’s talking about where the neighbour shot his car, and he says, “To pump”, “He pumped two into my windscreen” or “Two into my windscreen”.

So “To pump” here just means to shoot and I think he is referring to a shotgun that you would pump in order to get a bullet into the chamber like a pump-action-shotgun.

So for example, “One of the neighbours pumped a few gunshots into the air”.

(He) pumped two into me (my*) windscreen, one into the radiator, one into the bumper, and then one into the house.

You’ll hear there that he refers to the bumper of his car as “A bumper”.

We often use that in Australian English just calling it “The bumper”.

And this is just that protective bar on the front of a vehicle.

So for example, “Dad recently got a new bumper on his car”.

(He) pumped two into me (my*) windscreen, one of the radiator, one into the bumper and then one into the house.

A 61 year old man who lives two doors up.

Then you hear the reporter say he lives two doors up and you’ll often hear this, “up” or “down the road”.

So if someone lives “two doors up the road” they live two houses up the road.

And I guess they’re referring to the houses as “doors” as in front doors.

So “two doors up” is “Two houses up the road”, “Two houses along the street”, “Two doors down” is “Two houses down the road”.

So for example, “Some new neighbours moved in two doors up”, or you could say “Two doors up the road”.

A 61 year old man who lives two doors up had had enough of 23 year old Shane Tenagus and his hooning ways.

“To hoon” or “Hooning” ways.

“To hoon” is a verb that just means to drive recklessly.

So for example, “Our neighbours are real hoons, and they like hooning around in their cars”.

So they like driving recklessly.

And his hooning ways.

Shane chased the neighbour home but that’s when it took a nastier turn.

“To take a nasty turn”, means to get much worse.

To suddenly become a lot worse.

So for example, “Dad asked the neighbours not to hoon around in the streets, and things took a nasty turn when he started yelling”.

So the idea there would be once dad started yelling things got a lot worse.

So, maybe the neighbours got violent.

They got incredibly angry.

Things took a nasty turn because they got a lot worse.

But that’s when it took a nastier turn.

I had a kid inside here.

I was going to belt the shit out of him too.

To come up here and shoot my house while I got a kid inside.

“I was going to belt the shit out of him”.

This means to beat someone, to bash someone, and in order to sort of emphasise this and make it even more extreme you can say to belt, to beat, to bash the shit out of someone.

So it’s ruder, and it’s more extreme, but you can say, yeah, to belt someone, to beat someone, to bash someone, meaning to hit them or to really really hurt them in a fight.

And if you want to make it more extreme you can say “To beat the shit out of them”.

So for example, “We were afraid that dad was going to belt the shit out of the neighbours”.

I was going to belt the shit out of him too.

To come up here and shoot my ass like a kid inside.

What was going through your head when…

Then the reporter asks the guy what was going through his head, what was going through his head.

And “To go through your head” is to think about something.

So thinking about thoughts that are going through your head.

We use that quite a lot in English.

So for example, “Who knows what was going through the neighbours head, but they were scared”.

So it’s “Who knows what they were thinking about, but they were scared”.

What was going through your head when your car’s getting fired shots at…

What a crazy &*%$! What a fucking fruitloop!

Who does this? You know. That’s fruitloop!

Then he says, “A fruitloop”, “What a fruitloop!” talking about the neighbour being crazy.

“A fruitloop” is just a way that Australians will refer to someone who is out of their mind, insane, crazy.

What a fucking fruitloop! Who does this?

You know. That’s fruitloop!

Shane copped a wound to his toe but no serious injuries.

Then they say that this guy “Copped a wound to his toe”.

“To cop something” in English, “To cop something”, is to get or receive something, and it’s usually in a negative way.

So if you cop something it’s like it’s unwanted.

You’ve got it.

You’ve received it, but you didn’t want it.

Shane copped a wound to his toe.

The car and its contents a little more worse for wear.

The reporter then uses the phrase “To be worse for wear” talking about the stuff that had been shot inside of the car.

So, “To be worse for wear” means to be damaged or worn through use.

So, for example, “After the neighbours did a few burnouts their car tyres were a bit worse for wear”.

So, they’re worse because they’ve been worn, because of the wear, because they’ve been doing burnouts and damaging the tyres.

So, “The tyres were a bit worse for wear”.

The car and its contents are little more worse for wear.

And it’s not the first time Shane’s hobby has put him in the firing line.

“To put someone in the firing line”.

This is to put someone in a position where they are criticised or in danger.

So for example, “Dad was trying to protect us and make sure we weren’t (put) in the firing line.”

And it’s not the first time Shane’s hobby has put him in the firing line.

A mate did a burnout outside.

“A burnout”.

And if you haven’t got this already “A burnout” is the practice of keeping a vehicle stationary whilst spinning the wheels.

So often you’ll see a car, the front wheels have used the brake, so they’re not moving, and the back wheels are spinning on the spot.

And a lot of smoke is coming out.

There’s a lot of noise.

That’s “A burn out”. And you often see those two streaks of black marks on the road.

So for example, “The burnouts covered the road in black lines”.

A mate did a burnout outside.

So, I hope you’ve enjoyed this episode guys.

I hope it helps you improve your Australian English and understanding strong Australian accents, and I’ll see you when the next one.

Catch ya.

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Vocab:

To cop the brunt of something – to receive/bear the larger amount of something (negative)

e.g. Dad yelled at both of us but Pete copped the brunt of his anger.

To rip it up the road – to drive recklessly up the road

e.g. After dad finished yelling he got in his car and ripped it up the road.

A crazy old bastard – a crazy old man

e.g. The neighbours thought dad was a crazy old bastard!

To pump – to shoot (pump action shotgun)

e.g. One of the neighbours pumped a few gunshots into the air.

A bumper – a bumper bar – the protective bar on the front of a vehicle

e.g. Dad recently got a new bumper on his car.

To live # doors up (the road) – to live # of houses up the road / along the street

e.g. Some new neighbours moved in 2 doors up (the road).

To hoon/hooning – To drive recklessly

e.g. Our neighbours are real hoons and drive recklessly.

To take a nasty turn – To get much worse.

e.g. Dad asked the neighbours not to hoon around the streets, and things took a nasty turn when he started yelling.

To belt (the shit out of) someone – to beat/bash (the shit out of) someone

e.g. We were afraid dad was going to belt the shit out of one of the neighbours.

To go through one’s head – To think about

e.g. Who knows what was going through they neighbours’ heads, but they were scared.

A fruitloop – a crazy person/someone insane

e.g. They must’ve thought dad was a total fruitloop.

To cop something – to get/receive something (negative)

e.g. The neighbours certainly copped an earful from him.

To be worse for wear – To be damaged or worn through use.

e.g. After the neighbours did a few burnouts their car tyres were a bit worse for wear.

To put someone in the firing line – to put someone in a position where they are critcised/in danger.

e.g. Dad was just trying to protect us and make sure we weren’t in the firing line.

A burnout – the practice of keeping a vehicle stationary whilst spinning the wheels.

e.g. The burnouts covered the road in black lines.

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